CHARLES IN THE NAVY WW II - ABERNATHY ~ ABERNETHY FAMILY GENEALOGY

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CHARLES IN THE NAVY WW II

CHARLES C. & MARGUERITE TAYLOR ABERNATHY


Charles C. Abernathy served in the U.S. Navy from September 20, 1943 to April 30, 1946

Charles decided to join the U.S. Navy instead of waiting to be drafted into the Army. He wanted to join the branch of the military that would eable him to travel the most. A couple of days after speaking to a NAVY recruiter who was in the local area, he and about twenty or so other young men were taken to Atlanta by bus to enlist.



COPPER CITY ADVANCE

COPPERHILL, TENNESSEE
Thursday, November 16, 1944

WITH OUR BOYS IN THE SERVICE
ABERNATHY BROTHERS ARE OVERSEAS

Carl Edd Abernathy, seaman second class, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Abernathy. He is a graduate of Epworth High School. He entered the Navy on December 13, 1943 and received his boot training at Great Lakes, Ill. He attended fire control school at Newport, Rhode Island and has been serving in the Pacific theater since July of this year.

COPPER CITY ADVANCE

COPPERHILL, TENNESSEE
Thursday, November 16, 1944

WITH OUR BOYS IN THE SERVICE
ABERNATHY BROTHERS ARE OVERSEAS

Charles Cutts Abernathy, seaman first class, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Abernathy. He was a senior at Epworth High School when he entered the Navy on Sept. 20, 1943. He received his boot training at Great Lakes, Ill. and attended Armed Guard school at Norfolk, VA. He has been on active sea duty in the Atlantic since New Year’s Eve of this year.
Bottom photo taken on the SeaTrain Texas. Charles' crew was practicing loading their guns.

The picture of Charles in the rickshaw was taken while on leave in China.  The minesweeper group including the YMS 330 was docked in China waiting for orders to go into Japanese waters to clear the harbors for the Occupational forces.
 
 
 

The two above photos on the left are of Charles and other crew members of the YMS-330.  In the top group photo, Charles is second from the left. In the second photo, Charles is sitting on the right side of the group.

ALL THREE SHIP PHOTOS ARE OF THE MINESWEEPER YMS-330

     Charles was a member of the crew when the ship participated in the Occupation and Minesweeping Operations in the Empire of Japan, 
with Task Group 52.7, Bungo Suido Sweep Group (Hiro Wan Kure Ko Channel Sweep and Kure Naval Base Sweep). They went into clear the waterways harbors & channels of mines.
     The YMS-339 was the only minesweeper to be damaged in the harbor when a mine detonated behind the ship. None of the crew were badly hurt, but the minesweeper was too damaged to head home. Since this was Charles’ last mission, they sent him to Florida on a tramp steamer for discharge.



WW II Campaign Medals ~ Received by CHARLES C. ABERNATHY




American Campaign Medal ~ World War II

The American Campaign Medal - WW II (ACM) is granted to personnel who served one year of consecutive duty between December 7, 1941 to March 2, 1946 and within the continental boarders of the U.S., as well as to those who served 30 consecutive or 60 non-consecutive days of duty outside the borders of the U.S. but within the American Theater of Operations. The American Theater encompasses all of the U.S., most of the Atlantic Ocean, a portion of Alaska, and a small section of the Pacific bordering California and Baja California. The ACM was first created on November 6, 1942 and was originally issued as the "American Theater Ribbon" for those who served in the American Theater of Operations during World War II.

Asiatic Pacific Campaign ~ World War II

Criteria: The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal (ACPM) was awarded to any member of the United States Armed Forces who service in the Pacific Theater during World War II. It was created on November 6th, 1942 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Executive Order 9265. Additional awards of the medal are represented by a bronze star device worn on the award. There are 21 Army and 48 Navy and Marine Corps approved campaigns for this medal. An Arrowhead device is also authorized for campaigns which involved amphibious landings and certain sailors are authorized to wear the Fleet Marine Force device for combat operations.
While the award is issued for those who served from 1941 to 1945, the full sized medal wasn't created until 1947. The first recipient of the full sized medal was General Douglas MacArthur. The award may often be listed as the Asiatic-Pacific Theater ribbon on a serviceman's DD-214.

U. S. Navy China Service Military Medal (CHISM)

Criteria for Award: The medal was awarded for 30 days consecutive service while assigned to: a. Germany (excluding Berlin) between 9 May 1945 and 5 May 1955. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 will count only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945. b. Austria between 9 May 1945 and 27 July 1955. Service between 9 May and 18 November 1945 will count only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945. c. Berlin between 9 May 1945 and 2 October 1990. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 may be counted only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945. d. Italy between 9 May 1945 and 15 September 1947 in the compartment of Venezia Giulia E. Zara or Province of Udine, or with a unit in Italy designated in DA General Order 4, 1947. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 may be counted only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945. e. Japan between 3 September 1945 and 27 April 1952 in the four main islands of Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku and Kyushu; the surrounding smaller islands of the Japanese homeland; the Ryukyu Islands; and the Bonin-Volcano Islands. Service between 3 September 1945 and 2 March 1946 will be counted only if the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 3 September 1945.

European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal

Authorized on November 6, 1942, as amended on March 15, 1946. Awarded to members of the U.S. Armed Forces for at least 30 days of consecutive (60 days nonconsecutive) service within the European Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941 and November 8, 1945 (lesser periods qualify if individual was in actual combat against the enemy during this period).
The front of the bronze medal shows a Landing Ship, Tank (LST) unloading troops while under fire with an airplane overhead. The reverse has the American eagle, symbol of power, standing on a rock, symbol of stability, with the inscription, “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and dates, “1941-1945.”
Designated Navy and Marine Corps campaigns for the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal are as follows:

Reinforcement of Malta, 1942 North African Occupation, 1942-1943
Sicilian Occupation, 1943 Salerno Landings, 1943
West Coast of Italy Operations, 1944 Invasion of Normandy, 1944
Northeast Greenland Operation, 1944, Invasion of Southern France, 1944
Escort, antisubmarine, Armed Guard special operations, 1941-1944
The ribbon’s central blue, white and red stripes represent the United States. The wide green stripes represent the green fields of Europe, the brown edges represent the African desert sands, the thin green, white, and red stripes represent Italy and the thin black and white stripes represent Germany.



Navy Occupation Service Medal ~ World War II

Criteria: The World War II Navy Occupation Service Medal is a decoration awarded to members of the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard who served in specific regions of Europe or Asia following the end of WWII. A "Germany Bar" device is worn with the medal by personnel who served in the following locations in Europe during the accompanied dates: Italy (November 8, 1945 - December 15, 1947); Trieste (May 8, 1945 - October 25, 1954); Germany (May 8, 1945 - May 5, 1955); Austria (May 8, 1945 - October 25, 1955) and West Berlin (May 8, 1945 - October 3, 1990). A "Japan Bar" device is worn by personnel who served in the following locations in Asia during the accompanied dates: Japan (September 3, 1945 to April 27, 1952), and; Korea (September 3, 1945 to June 29, 1949).

Victory Medal ~ World War II

Services: All Services
Instituted: 1945
Qualifying Dates: 7 December 1941 to 31 December 1946
Criteria: Awarded for service in US Armed Forces between 1941 and 1946. If a veteran served at least 1 day prior to 31 December 1946, he/she is eligible for this award.
Authorized by Act of Congress on July 6, 1945 and awarded to all members of the Armed Forces who served at least one day of honorable, active federal service between December 7, 1941 and December 31, 1946, inclusive.
The front of the medal depicts the Liberty figure resting her right foot on a war god's helmet with the hilt of a broken sword in her right hand and the broken blade in her left hand. The reverse contains the words, "FREEDOM FROM FEAR AND WANT, FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND RELIGION, and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 1941-1945." The red center stripe of the ribbon is symbolic of Mars, the God of War, representing both courage and fortitude. The twin rainbow stripes, suggested by the World War I Victory Medal, allude to the peace following a storm. A narrow white stripe separates the center red stripe from each rainbow pattern on both sides of the ribbon. The World War II Victory Medal provides deserving recognition to all of America's veterans who served during World War II.
No attachments were authorized although some veterans received the medal with an affixed bronze star which, according to rumors at the time, was to distinguish those who served in combat from those who did not. However, no official documentation has ever been found to support this supposition. Although eligible for this award, many World War II veterans never actually received the medal since many were discharged prior to the medal's institution.


 
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